News

National Council of Churches Urges Genocide Recognition

One of the leading ecumenical organizations in America, the National Council of Churches, released a letter to U.S. President Biden, urging him to recognize the Armenian Genocide in anticipation of the coming April 24th commemoration.

The letter from NCC President Rev. James Winkler states: “The NCC finds it unacceptable that the United States has yet to officially recognize the Genocide of 1915, which decimated a majority of the Armenian population then living in Asia Minor. The historical record should be rectified.”

Archbishop Vicken Aykazian, Diocesan Legate and Ecumenical Director of the Eastern Diocese, is mentioned in Rev. Winkler’s letter as a member of the NCC executive board. Archbishop Aykazian also served a substantial tenure as President of the ecumenical organization.

Read the entire letter below.

* * *

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.

President Joseph R. Biden, Jr.
The White House

Dear Mr. President,

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC) has long called for official recognition by the United States government of the Armenian Genocide. Therefore, we urge you to give this official recognition on the anniversary of the genocide, April 24.

From the 4th Century, the Armenian community has been a living and vibrant witness to the Gospel that is at the heart of our shared Christian faith. This community suffered through genocide at the turn of the 20th century, with the loss of one-and-a-half million lives through persecution by the Ottoman Empire.

The Armenian Church of America is an important part of the NCC and Archbishop Vicken Aykazian is a member of the executive committee of the NCC.

The NCC finds it unacceptable that the United States has yet to officially recognize the Genocide of 1915, which decimated a majority of the Armenian population then living in Asia Minor. The historical record should be rectified.

The Armenian Genocide was the first genocide of the 20th century and it marked the beginning of what is commonly referred to as the bloodiest, most violent century in all of human history. During the horrific period beginning in 1915 and continuing until 1923, more than 1 million Armenians (and others) were killed, and hundreds of thousands more were displaced. The dead were buried in the land where they had lived for generations. The refugees were dispersed throughout the world, and some to the United States, where their future generations have now become the friends and neighbors with whom we stand today.

The Armenian people have provided inspiration by standing against the evil of genocide wherever and whenever it is committed. Now is the moment for the United States of America to recognize the Armenian Genocide.

Sincerely,

Jim Winkler
General Secretary and President

April 20, 2021

Above: Diocesan Legate Abp. Vicken Aykazian and NCC President Rev. James Winkler.

Share it on

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Support Our Programs